Monday, August 25, 2014

Alain Laboile




photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile


photo by Alain Laboile

photo by Alain Laboile


photo by Alain Laboile




all images above were taken by the artist Alain Laboile and were found here






About Alain Laboile...

Born on May 1, 1968 in Bordeaux, France, Alain Laboile is a photographer and father of six.

In 2004, as he needed to put together a portfolio of his work as a sculptor, he acquired a camera, and thus developped a taste for macrophotography, spurred by his passion for entomology.

Later on, he pointed his lens towards his growing family which became his major subject, be it in a realistic depiction of their atypical lifestyle in “La Famille”, or in bizarre stagings around a pond in “Réflexion autour du bassin”.

Alain Laboile's work has since been exhibited around the world and he is scheduled to publish a book with Steidl Verlag.


text from above found here



And now I feel compelled to blab a bit about my thoughts on photography...

We see so many photographs every day, but every now and again I see a photograph that stops me in my tracks. It makes me pause in wonder. That is how I feel about these photographs by Alain Laboile.  They are SO GOOD.  The subject matter, the lighting, the timing, the composition, the connection they bring -- pretty much perfect.

Long, long ago I took a photography course at a community college.  I ended up taking the class over and over again with the same instructor.  Often times we were given rather mundane assignments (take pictures of red round things!). We had to take our photographs with Kodachrome (quite possibly the most unforgiving film ever created, but I kind of miss it!) using a manual camera.  To put it bluntly: my photos weren't very good.  I could get one element right -- maybe lighting or maybe composition, but then the shot would be slightly out of focus.  Or harsh afternoon shadows would ruin the effect I was going for.  Or the subject matter was pretty boring.  Or something like that. But I kept at it and tried to get a little bit better. I think it takes a long time for most of us to improve our photographs, but with time and persistence it can happen. :)

A few things I have learned about photography: 

•Not every shot works.  In fact, most shots DON'T WORK. When possible, take a zillion shots hoping that ONE of them might work.
•Not every shot needs to be published.  When I first started posting pics on Instagram, I was FRANTIC to post a shot every day.  WHY???????  Crazy!  If the pic is shitty, if it is out of focus, if it is grainy, if the lighting sucks, and if the viewer will have NO IDEA WHAT IT IS, why post it?!  Sometimes less is more.  
•There will always be the one that got away.  You can't catch everything.  Get over it.  Try your best and move on.  
•Keep your eyes open.  There are a million interesting things going on in our world, and it is up to you to SEE it, and to try and capture it.  
•Composition counts.  I think some people get this naturally, and some don't.  Cropping is your friend.  Or carefully composing in the first place so that much cropping isn't needed.  I don't really know how to explain good composition.  Maybe someday I will post some pics (pics of my own) that have crappy composition, and how I fixed them to have better composition.  Maybe. 
•I hate flash photography, and I refuse to use it.  I just can't stand it, and I'd rather miss out on a shot than use a flash.  So I have to rely on natural lighting to get what I want.  Some photographers have a style that incorporates flash photography and harsh shadows, and they make it work (Terry Richardson comes to mind).  So...there is no ONE way to be a good photographer.  You can pretty much make anything work. 
•Sometimes I have stupid debates in my head -- is one a better photographer for catching things on the fly, or is one a more skilled photographer if they can carefully arrange/set-up shots?  The answer?  Neither -- they both have their place and I don't think one is necessarily better than the other.  
•Yay or nay to filters?  Meh.  I am sort of bored with filters at this point, but I was very excited about them years ago, mostly because they can make a shitty shot a little or a lot better.  I think every photographer enhances at least some of their shots with filters, with Photoshop, or in the darkroom, but I am most excited when I can get something naturally and I don't need to enhance it.  But to each his/her own -- whatever works.   
•There are a lot of trends in photography (particularly pictures on Instagram, Facebook, and blogs). Feet shots. Manicure shots. Sunset shots. Food shots. Pet shots. Architecture shots. Flower shots. Palm tree shots. Street art shots. Etcetera. After a while, many pictures/feeds start to feel so routine. Predictable. I am just as guilty of posting predictable pics as the next person, and I think most of us could stand to mix it up and vary the subject matter and setting.  But maybe I am just fickle?  Easily bored?  Maybe I am comparing apples and oranges?  Social media photography vs. fine art photography?  Maybe social media pics don't need to be held to a higher standard?  I don't know.  Maybe.  Regardless, clearly I like surprise and unpredictability, and I tend to over-analyze/be critical of things that I find to be repetitious. 


Well I have babbled on and on here, so I'll shut up for now.  Take a good look at the photos above.  They are inspiring, and they make me want to be a better amateur photographer.  :)



Thursday, August 14, 2014

Check, Please

check-please

My co-worker and I were talking about the problem of dining out with a group of friends.  You know.  The check shows up and there is always an issue.  The porker that ordered lobster and 5 cocktails suggests that the bill be split evenly -- even though everyone else just ordered a modestly priced meal and a single solitary drink.  Then there is the friend that never puts in enough money and everyone else has to overcompensate for her cheap ass.  Then there is the friend that ALWAYS sends her food back (I'm talking about YOU, Stacey!  Who sends WAFFLES back to the kitchen?!?!?!).  Then there is the friend that thinks a 10% tip is more than enough.  It's annoying.

My co-worker mentioned that she has one friend in her social circle that is invited when the group goes out to eat.  This chick never orders anything.  No food.  No drink.  Just water.  She just sits and talks and drinks her water while everybody else enjoys their food.  And, obviously, she doesn't pitch in when the bill comes.

I think this is HILARIOUS.  Pretty much a social faux pas (or as my dad pronounces it, "fox pox") in my book, but she avoids the bill problems mentioned above. 

My sister told me that a former friend of ours was at a group dinner in a restaurant.  Instead of ordering food and drink like a normal human being, she announced that she was doing a cleanse, and she pulled out her own sack lunch and ate from it.  HELLO TACKY!

Long ago I used to babysit for a family.  They had a nice house.  He made good money.  The wife mentioned that they were all (a family of four) going to the movies, and that she bought a ticket for herself and for the two kids, but that she didn't buy a ticket for the husband. So I asked why. She said, "Oh Michael won't pay to see movies on principle." ?!?!?!? WTF!!!! So each time they would go to the movies, the wife/mom would pay for tickets for herself and the kids, and then go in to the theater and sit.  And then her jerk-off husband Michael would arrive later, and tell the movie people that his wife had already bought his ticket and that he was meeting her inside.  What a jerk.  I can only imagine what he would be like at a restaurant.





Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Corey Grayhorse



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As a native of Venice, California, both culture and environment have influenced my art. A desire to capture imaginative composition led to a study of photography at Santa Monica College. There, I infused my work with the color and flavor of an eclectic and eccentric community. I relocated to Providence, Rhode Island in 2001, and continued to develop as a photographer.

My work is contemporary and studied; everything is by design. A wide-ranging influence of styles in art, photography, fashion, and set design, as well as traditional and pop culture inform my perspective. My trademarks of color, composition, and lighting are apparent as consistent threads throughout my work. All of these serve as a strong narrative in each piece.

Attention to detail and artful manipulation of the medium elevate my work beyond just photography. This process involves the creation of elaborate sets and costumes. Each element is thought out and carefully placed as part of the story. In a sense, these sets are installations and performance art constructed and acted solely by me. Through the addition of characters, my portraits show a deep interest in the human expression. Use of a fish eye lens creates strange beauty and satire, eliciting emotional and social responses. Frozen in time through photography, the work becomes a window into a fantastic dream world, drawing my audience in.

In my world, Japanese Street Culture collides with Haute Couture, and Hello Kitty courts Marie Antoinette. I take these icons from their original context and superimpose them into a new one, contrasting the traditional with the contemporary. My images are fresh and lively, and it is clear that I have as much fun making them, as the spectator has viewing them.


text above found here