Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Mike Brodie

Mike Brodie, #0924, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #3018, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #3102, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #3025, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5126, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #4352, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #3044, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #3733, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #4558, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #3069, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #4566, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #4925, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5060, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #0915, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5065, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5168, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5122, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5216, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5999, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5765, 2006-2009


Mike Brodie, #5257, 2006-2009




Born in 1985, Mike Brodie began photographing when he was given a Polaroid camera in 2004. Working under the moniker 'The Polaroid Kidd,' Brodie spent the next four years circumambulating the United States, amassing an archive of photographs that make up one of the few, true collections of American travel photography. Brodie made work in the tradition of photographers like Robert Frank, William Eggleston and Stephen Shore, but due to never having undergone any formal training he always remained untethered to the pressures and expectations of art market.

Brodie compulsively documented his exploration of the tumultuous world of transient subcultures without regard to how the photographs would exist beyond him. After feeling as though he documented all that he could of his subject, his insatiable wanderlust found a new passion, and as quickly as he began making photographs, he has left the medium to continue in his constant pursuit of new adventures.

In 2008, Brodie received the Baum Award for American Emerging Artists  and has a forthcoming book to be published by Steidl, as well as numerous international shows. Brodie recently graduated from the Nashville Auto Diesel College (NADC) and is now working as a diesel mechanic. Although Brodie has stopped making photographs, the body of work he made in only four short years has left a huge impact on the photo world, and is now being made available to the public.


Images and text found here


To read an interesting conversation between Barbara Davidson and the artist (published in the LA Times), click here.










7 comments:

The Savage said...

Hipster hobos!

Jen said...

Incredible. My nephew is actually a hobo. Graduated from SF State and hit the train tracks and hasn't looked back. He's been all over the world hiding on boats and trains. He's in Nicuraugua now working on a farm and loving his life. I'm going to share these amazing photos with him.

Trissta said...

Wow. That's crazy! I can't believe that he gave up photography to become a diesel mechanic. That is cray-zee. But such is the life of an artist. Never satisfied with one thing. Always exploring and learning new things.

Much Love,
Trissta

Caroline said...

wow...just wow...

Regina said...

These are amazing...

ajg-jane said...




Incredible.









Shannon said...

Love these.