Thursday, May 1, 2014

Jessica Joslin

La Luz de Jesus Gallery has a Taxidermy Show opening on May 2, 2014.  Although her works are not taxidermy per se, I think the most interesting works in the exhibition are by Jessica Joslin.  Here are a few examples of her intricate creations:


Jessica Joslin, Hermes
Jessica Joslin, Hermes

Jessica Joslin, Hermes detail
Jessica Joslin, Hermes (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Theodora
Jessica Joslin, Theodora

Jessica Joslin, Theodora detail
Jessica Joslin, Theodora (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Claudius
Jessica Joslin, Claudius



Jessica Joslin, Waldo
Jessica Joslin, Waldo



Jessica Joslin, Gage
Jessica Joslin, Gage

Jessica Joslin, Gage detail
Jessica Joslin, Gage (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Sylvian and Ezra
Jessica Joslin, Sylvian and Ezra

Jessica Joslin, Sylvian and Ezra (detail of Sylvian)
Jessica Joslin, Sylvian and Ezra (detail of Sylvian)



Jessica Joslin, Bellamy
Jessica Joslin, Bellamy

Jessica Joslin, Bellamy detail
Jessica Joslin, Bellamy (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Troy
Jessica Joslin, Troy

Jessica Joslin, Troy detail
Jessica Joslin, Troy (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Camille and Alceste
Jessica Joslin, Camille and Alceste



Jessica Joslin, Queenie detail
Jessica Joslin, Queenie (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Miette
Jessica Joslin, Miette

Jessica Joslin, Miette detail
Jessica Joslin, Miette (detail)



Jessica Joslin, Penelope
Jessica Joslin, Penelope

Jessica Joslin, Penelope detail
Jessica Joslin, Penelope (detail)




About the artist:



The creatures that populate Jessica Joslin's world are intricate fusions of bone, brass, antique hardware and other scavenged treasures. Infused with the Victorian era’s passion for natural history and arcane technology, these creatures reflect both the real and the imagined animal, the living and the dead. Through careful observation and intricate construction, they re-imagine the animal kingdom, bolt by bolt, beast by beast. They are a nod to the Wunderkammer of yore, and the Victorian predilection for invention and exploring science through the collecting of naturalia. The precision of the engineering conveys a sense that these beasts are anatomically plausible, and the spark of life is simulated through limpid glass eyes, engaging the viewer silently and directly.

Inspired by the beauty of skeletal architecture, and a passion for assemblage sculpture, Jessica Joslin began building her bestiary of mechanical animals in 1992. Her collection of creatures includes a myriad of different species and hybrids, and numbers over 200 sculptures in total. With a extensive background in the professional trades, Joslin honed her fabrication skills building toy prototypes, architectural models, trade show displays, photo props, and film sets. Her monograph, “Strange Nature” was published in 2008, and her work has been featured in numerous books, magazines and exhibitions worldwide.


source for biography above








3 comments:

E said...

Steampunk-tastic! And a little bit creepy... I like it :-)

Trissta said...

Whoa. Those are super cool! The more I look, the more detail I see. I'd agree that they're definitely on the steampunk trend!

Much Love,
Trissta

diane said...

Warped and exquisite.
Happy Spring sweetie.
Mwahhh! xo d